Don’t let go…

lookahead

 

Recently it has become increasingly difficult to hold onto what I believe in and dream of for public education.* Some days it feels possibility died or is very close to death.  Bright clear dreams, plans and ideas have become clouded and distorted to the point of unrecognizable. You may also have felt this way and had dark days such as these. Over time, my mental arms have grown weary from grasping tightly to what I hold dear. Over time, wisps of doubt have stealthily crept in. Why bother to hold onto something that seems invisible to many? Why protectively carry ideals that at times feel valueless? The uncertainty and deep despair of this thought has hurt my heart, mind and inner core.

It feels as I have been worn down and tapped out…it would be so much easier to just…let go…

To let the dreams and ideals I began teaching with drop, would be so freeing.  After all, back then I was naive to the ways of the world. I wouldn’t have to care anymore. Done. Out. Cut and dry. Just a job.

But…every time I get within a hair of letting it all go…I just can’t. For the past several months this contemplation has both haunted and trapped me.  It would seem that until I resolved this decision, I couldn’t move in any concrete direction, I was at a standstill. This grey no man’s land coloured a part of my life usually bright and full of joy. I was paralyzed by the possibility: will THIS be the time I give in and give up? Will this be the TIME I disengage completely, stop feeling and caring?

Mistakenly I thought it would be easy. Easy to let go. I even thought I wanted to. I don’t want to get all moral and heavy-handed with it either, this struggle comes from my deepest beliefs about what I hold as precious, true and right. But when it came right down to it, I just couldn’t do it.

***

So take these tenuous threads with which we collectively sew humanity and never doubt your connection to this purpose for one breath, one heartbeat. And if you were as I, holding your breath and holding your beliefs tenderly as a dying lover, I offer this…

Do not doubt yourself and your ideals in these dark moments. Look forward to the light of what is possible. Be sure of what you know as good and true. Imagine your big impossible dreams boldly and loudly.

Hold on. Hold on to what you know to be true and right.

Hold on dear friends, hold on.

———————————————–

* this post is in reference to the challenges of job action in British Columbia over the last several months.

How might we co-create a lexicon of learning to empower our students?

Do students use the same words you use to talk about their learning? Are the words you use as an educator reserved for conversations about students or are the words you use for conversations with students?

***
How might we create a lexicon for learning that invites our students in? How might we find words to include students implicitly in the process of learning rather than as something done to them and for them but not always of them? How might we move to words that explore learning as something not just done at school for 5 hours a day but a stance to take for life? How might we co-create a language that explores the emotions, depths, and connections of learning? How might we find words to use not about students but for students? What words might we use not only to describe students but to be used by students in the service of their learning?

***

I am wondering if we might consider….

  • the design of learning spaces, pathways and experiences in place of linear and one time only lessons and lesson plans.
  • talking about learning pathways (with multiple entry points) instead of one time activities or worksheets to complete.
  • creating environments of agency rather than policies of accountability.
  • using the words “invite you” and “you could do” with students instead of “you must do” and “you have to.”
  • talking about being inspired rather than about being on task.
  • imagining and exploring what students need instead of listing what work is required.
  • asking students what they see, feel, hear, imagine and dream rather than only asking what they think.
  • starting from empathy for our students rather than exclusively from the learning outcomes.
  • creating opportunities for students to celebrate their learning rather than only creating summative assessments to be given (tests and quizzes).
  • inviting students to collect artifacts of their learning instead of doing formative assessments to students.
  • nurturing creativity instead of always pushing productivity.
  • inviting students to share their learning journeys rather than describing learning with a spreadsheet.
  • asking students to create stories to tell rather than give them notes to copy.
  • inviting students to do work that matters instead of work for marks.
  • referring to ourselves as “learners in chief” or “lead learners” instead of exclusively “teachers.”
  • asking students what they do well already before telling students what they must do.

***

What words or phrases might you consider changing? What stance do the words you currently use represent? What words work well and hold meaning for both for you and for your students? What words do your students use that you don’t when talking about their learning?

***

How might we co-create a lexicon of learning to empower our students?

I Don’t Get to Choose

ORPHANED

Photo Shared on Flickr

 

I used to think it was like a game of pool; just focus on the ball and if I set the shot up right, the ball will fall successfully into the pocket.  As long as I focused on the desired point of impact…success!

Except I found out, it’s not like that at all. I found out in fact…that I don’t get to choose who I impact and how.
And I am not talking about Hattie’s influence “Teacher know your impact.” I am not suggesting you would avoid trying to impact your students in the learning sense. It’s just learning takes years and years to accumulate and manifest.

I am not talking about impact as in getting the person to vote for a certain political party or in buying you Christmas gifts or behaving in a desired manner. No the impact I am thinking of is a little trickier to pin down and identify.

This impact is more like peeling back a layer of an onion to get to the next level, or flipping a switch on a path that is defined by thousands of switches. Or it’s like the light of a tiny fire fly in a jar in a universe of dark. Or it is like a lingering perfume that stays with you for years. This type of impact is not a huge catalytic event of influence. It is gentle and kind and light and not pre-determined.
But the thing of it is, which is just so awe-inspiring and lovely…you just never know how what you say, do, or write, exactly impacts another person at the certain point in their life.

And as over the years as I have had the fortune to see students years later, it is never the influence I thought I had on the students I thought I had it. Often times it is the students I thought I was not connecting to, the students who really were not “interested” who in fact felt impacted in some small way. Often times it is the student who did not laugh at my jokes, or offer to help, or the ones I might have interacted with a little bit more. Sometimes it is the biology (the course I teach) they say they remember, but often times it was an unrelated story or a certain activity we did. Sometimes it is just a funny occurrence that happened in class. Sometimes just a memory of a place they enjoyed being.
But the students I thought I connected with were not the ones I impacted in a profound way. Often times the student did not stand out. Instead I stood out for them.

And when I get emails or DM’s from people who I have never meet and probably never will meet, who say your such and such blog post really touched me or that post on assessment made me really think. I am always dumbfounded that my words here can go hurtling out into space and make contact with another person’s brain and the words might form into new thoughts and ideas inside their brain. Our connection forged with this fine tenuous thread of words. And if I write thinking I know my impact “oh I’ll write this blog post for so and so they’ll love it!” Chances are so and so won’t even read it! So and so will not connect in any way shape of form to my words.

I don’t get to choose.

As with a beloved helium balloon you finally decide to release and set free, you don’t know exactly who is going to see it and what exactly it will mean to the person who sees it.  No doubt the randomness and uncertainty of it is a bit alarming. But on the other hand it also is incredibly freeing.

Letting my ideas and thoughts and stories and pictures free into the world, I don’t know exactly who is going to connect to them and exactly what they will mean to anyone , students or otherwise.

I don’t get to choose.

When classroom observations make sense

observations

 Shared on flickr by Ralph Hockens

People are incredibly sensitive to the environment and the culture—to the norms and expectations of the communities they are in.
~Chip and Dan Heath

Full disclosure: I am no Instructional Rounds expert. The majority of my exposure to Instructional Rounds has been experiential and in context of the work I do as part of our district’s Instructional Leadership Team (6 teachers who work on site with teachers in an iterative cycle of co-planning, co-teaching and co-learning). As such I would rate my knowledge of the theory behind instructional rounds as low (I just want to make that part very clear 🙂 ). I also have to admit I did not “get” the Instructional Rounds concept. At all. That is before I saw it and experienced it in practice and on site. This made 2 aspects of professional learning and change evident to me:
1. Telling someone about a practice is not an effective way for them to understand it (i.e. as most Pro-D in the past has been).
2. When an initiative (practice) is presented in isolation, it does not always make sense or seem relevant.

The majority of our work happens on site with a school based group of teachers.  Our first steps on site are usually to co-construct criteria for collaborative work. This can feel like a laborious process but as with any new process you often don’t feel the benefits until well into it or till even after. Next steps are to identify an area of need (what are they seeing in their students) and establish a collective rational for the why of the work to reveal a common pathway (5 why protocol can be used to drill down). As well the creation of “if…then” statements can be useful to determine the why of the work we are about to undertake.  I really like this stage as it provides the opportunity to create a prediction and predictions invite us to wonder if they will be true! So for example we might say: “if we design lessons with voice and choice then our students will take more ownership over their learning” or “if we build stamina (using Daily 5) then our students will become independent learners.”

Onto co-planning

The co-planning stage sets up the tension for the underlying why of classroom observations (in my limited experience!).
If we do this…then this will happen…ok let’s find out if it’s true. Observations rather than inferences allow us to find patterns and trends instead of making judgments and opinions. After the observations is when the magic happens!  Through the process of sharing and sorting the observations as a group is when the co-learning happens. I have to admit I did not really get the co-learning part until I experienced it IRL. The moment we come out of a classroom observation (based on a lesson we co-planned) the connections between our observations happen. We saw similar things (observations are neutral, they are not opinions) the patterns begin to emerge; it becomes immediately evident the changes we might need to make to the co-planned lesson. But also evident are the successes and details that paint a full picture of what is actually going on in the class. The meaningful nods occur all without judgment or value statements. At this moment everyone is keen and ready to change, tweak and celebrate the lesson; it becomes obvious what needs to be slightly adjusted or added. Teachers are eager to get at it right at it and often want to co-teach the same lesson again that afternoon or next day. The natural progression to co-plan again emerges organically and does not feel forced.
This process connects the causal relationship between planning to the specifics of what happens in the classroom (yes we all know this…but when we experience it followed by observations it has a different impact). This process reveals teaching as experimentation. It also moves the focuses from what the teacher is doing and to what students are doing. The process also makes evident how useful observations can be in general and opens the door to observations as a way to provide students with useful feedback (as opposed to judgments or evaluations).

Why this kind of classroom observation makes sense:

1. Creates permission to tinker on teaching practice.
2. Moves us out of silos (beyond grade partners, subject specialties, schools).
3. Moves us away from widget making mindset: it is not to create as many lessons as possible but rather to see the lesson plan as always in process.
4. No one person is perceived as THE expert; together we co-create understanding of quality and a “nose for quality.”
5. Shows small changes are possible (creates belief change is possible).
6. Topples belief that Pro-D should be like a fast acting cold medication with a one-time dose.

But more than anything else this process helps remind us:

We learn to do the work by doing the work, not by telling other people to do the work, not by having done the work at some time in the past, and not by hiring experts who can act as proxies for our knowledge about how to do the work.
~Richard Elmore

master or masterpiece?

It’s late August, you are back at school setting up your classroom. Your neighboring teacher pokes her head in to say hi and catch up: “Have you seen your class lists yet? Who do you have?” You hand her the printed lists lying on your desk. As she glances over the lists she shares: “Oh him, he is great! Oh no, not her, she struggles with everything!”

So innocent and so human, to want to know a bit about the students you will work with over the course of the next several months.

***

I promised myself I would try to avoid preconceived ideas about students. I wanted to let them be blank canvases as they entered the class and paint their own story, fresh for the first time. I even went as far to make a poster in big bold letters and post it up at the back of the classroom as a daily reminder to myself of this very thing:

Expectation becomes the realization

While my intentions were good it turned out my practice was not.

A couple of years into teaching I had the chance to work with students I worked with in Science 8 again in Chemistry 11. I was thrilled to have already established relationships in place! As such we had richer conversations, less ground work to cover to create mutual understanding. But with that prior knowledge of each other guess what else crept in?

I learned in talking with students how I had broken my own rule of thumb. In conversation one day, a student said: “Yeah I even got “name of student who always gets A’s” to do my lab for me and you still gave me…”
In that moment I was caught; I had fallen for the name on the page and not the words on the page. I was judging students on what I knew of them rather than the evidence of their learning they were sharing with me. I was marking everything students put a pen on and evaluating nothing. Oh I had so much to learn!

My take away that day (beyond the burning shame of being blatantly wrong and floored by how much I had to learn) was…
I needed to look at the evidence and not the person presenting it, regardless of what I knew of them, felt about them or had heard about them. I wanted to look for the potential masterpiece…and sometimes it would be crumpled, the spelling atrocious, and handed in late…but it could be a masterpiece! Would I see it?

Today I continue to ask myself when:

  • I read a tweet or a blog…
  • I evaluate or assess…
  • I listen to a student’s idea or suggestion…
  • I choose to retweet or share a blog…
  • I sit in a meeting…
  • I read student work on the crumpled or torn paper…

What am I reacting to? What am I really evaluating? What am I connecting to? What do I base my opinions on?

What do you react and connect to?

The master or the masterpiece?

Can you be held accountable for something you own?

“Accountability is something that is left when responsibility has been subtracted.”
Pasi Salberg

 

Last year my daughter told us she wanted a new iPhone. “Ok” we said “you will just have to pay for it yourself.” So off she went to get a part-time job, saved over several months and finally had the funds to purchase her iPhone.
Fast forward to this fall when she was getting out of my husband’s truck with the beloved in hand. You can probably guess what happened!  As she was exiting the truck the phone slipped out of her hand and clattered onto the driveway. Before you could say “I love iPhones,” crack and shatter…the screen was toast. She was devastated, her beloved ruined. She felt bad, so badly, that she had in a 2 second window let her iPhone slick out of her grasp. Back to saving she went to get the screen repaired. I am not going to claim this event totally changed her phone carrying behavior, but she did get a different case and she did assume complete responsibility.  But the thing of it was she owned the phone. We couldn’t be “mad at her” or disappointed with her for dropping it, as she was mad and disappointed with herself. We didn’t jump need to assume responsibility for the phone, it was hers, 100%.

***

While I get that phones and learning and very different this story helps to make a point.

We say we want students to own their learning, right? We say we want students to become independent learners, right? Can anyone own something when held accountable externally for it? When we, with our best intentions, say we need to hold our students accountable for their learning, is this is not an oxymoron? Can someone be held accountable for something that is theirs? And the very second we do hold students accountable do we not extinguish, in that very moment, all hope that students will in fact ever own their learning, because in that very well-meaning moment, haven’t we owned the learning for them?

Do we think we have to hold students accountable as they not capable? If learning is to be authentic to them and for them are they not capable of that?  Is it that they don’t care? Perhaps this has to do with the fact that the learning was never theirs in the first place. It is hard to be forced to care about something that is not and will never be yours.

***
How do you feel when you are held accountable? Do you feel empowered or dis-empowered?
When you are engaged fully in a project you love and are passionate about do you need to be held accountable for it? At all?

 

When I grow up

Neoteny, one of my favorite words, means the retention of childlike attributes in adulthood: idealism, experimentation and wonder. In this new world, not only must we behave more like children, we also must teach the next generation to retain those attributes that will allow them to be world-changing, innovative adults who will help us reinvent the future.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Joi Ito

 

When I grow up I’ll invent make a big mess day, where you don’t have to clean up your project till you are all done and making a mess is expected.

When I grow up I’ll let curiosity be my trusty guide. I’ll remember how it feels to have your own burning questions and not even want an answer; just want a way to discover.

When I grow up I’ll remember how not to worry about making mistakes and how I did everything I loved without self-judgment. I’ll remember how I could be a ballerina, an artist and a scientist all in the same day.

When I grow up, I’ll remember how to be kooky and silly. I’ll remember after being silly it is a piece of cake to settle down.

When I grow up, I’ll remember the black journal I saved my money to buy and how excited I was to fill it with my learning when I got to “real” school.

When I grow up I am going to remember to never take myself or my job too seriously. I’ll remember how it is possible to move on when something does not work out my way.

When I grow up I’ll remember the things I love to do are the things I need to do, everyday. I’ll remember those things are the things that make life delicious, delectable and possible.

When I grow up I’ll remember how my enthusiasm and curiosity sometimes made me loud, rambunctious and full of energy. I’ll remember how enthusiasm looks and feels and embrace it on the spot with open arms.

When I grow up I’ll remember to daydream, imagine and create. I’ll remember how big my dreams were and are. I’ll remember how vivid my imagination was and is. I’ll remember how easy it was to create.

When I grow up, I’ll remember.
What will you remember when you grow up?

)

Because #poetry

poems

Shared on Flickr by Kariann Blank

“A poet is a verb that blossoms light in gardens of dawn, or sometimes midnight.”
Aberjhani

Before you say but “I am not an English teacher” or “I am an administrator” consider: are you looking for ways to infuse creativity and divergent thinking into to your class or staff? And before you say: “sure but I just can’t imagine it!” check out these examples of poetry “out-of-bounds.” Have you talked about or thought about creativity and playfulness as vital to igniting and sustaining learning? Poetry invites both! Wouldn’t poetry be a great way to invite students (and teachers) to make sense of content and themselves? What if poetry was seen as a way to make sense of the world…not just in English class but in all classes and for adults as well!

Before you say “well I just don’t have time!” No worries! Start small and consider trying a #sixwordstory to summarize part of a lesson or staff meeting.  And if that sounds overwhelming start with “just one word” and then create a collective found poem (see description below). Sounds fun right?!

Some reasons you might consider poetry:

1. Invites fun and playfulness.
Students often see “school learning” as a series of rules to be followed exactly. Poetry invites playfulness and fun into the process. Learning is fun and playful, playing with words is a great way to show case this.

2. Showcases and normalizes divergent thinking.
When students see learning as an answer on a worksheet they become uncomfortable and intolerant of divergent thinking. Writing a poem showcases that there be many legitimate ways to understand and explain a topic. It also models to students that there is more than one way of knowing and explaining.

3. Opportunity to make meaning and make it public.
Learning is all about making meaning for ourselves and sharing this meaning with others. What better way than through a poem or performance!

4. Invites and encourages creativity as a viable way to operate in school.
When we only do creative acts in certain subjects it signals creativity as only useful for certain topics, but don’t we want students to think creativity is important for all subjects?

5. Develops a sense of identity.
When all answers are identical it is challenging to develop a sense of ownership and personal connection. Poetry allows for personal flair and perspective to shine through.

Poetry Resources and Examples Round Up

1. Poetry in the classroom pinterest board 

2. Just One Word
Not feeling the poetry thing? Ok how about “just one word”? At the end of a unit, day, class, meeting or movie clip, ask students to think of one word that captures their thoughts. After they all have their word have students say their word aloud in rapid succession to create a “found poem.”  It is always interesting to hear the similarities and patterns that emerge. Want to dial this activity up a notch? Collect the words and use as the raw materials to create a #sixwordstory.

3. Biopoem
Unsure about using poetry in your classroom? Get started with a formulaic type poem. I have used biopoems at the start of semester to get to know my students and then used it over the course of the semester for the different organisms we study in Biology. You could use it to explore a character in history or a type of equation in math.

A biopoem is a poem that describes a person/character/animal/etc  in 11 lines. There is a specific formula to use when writing a bio poem. Bipoem form to use here and outlined below:

First name…
Four adjectives that describe the person/character/organism…
Relative of…
Lover of (three different things that the person loves)…
Who feels (three different feelings and when or where they are felt)…
Who gives (three different things the person gives)…
Who fears (three different fears the person has)…
Who would like to see (three different things the person would like to see)…
Who lives (a brief description of where the person lives)
Last name…

4. #sixwordstory
Students choose (or are provided with) an object, picture, event, sentence…then are invited to write a story using only six words. These stories can be shared verbally or posted into a doc, a slide show, on a sticky or tweeted out. An example from my Biology class is provided below (students wrote on stickies and I posted to our Facebook group). Six words do not intimidate anyone!

 

6 word story
Template to use here
Some great examples are here and hereMore examples (as more is always more!).

5. Blackout Poem
A couple of weeks ago @davidtedu wrote this awesome post in which he highlighted blackout poems. His post was the catalyst and inspiration for my poetry craze of late (thanks David!).

Students could create one individually or in groups and could use a newspaper, magazine or old paper back. I thought this would be a great way to “churn up” a professional article with teachers and the blackout poem they created would summarize what the article meant to them. Black out poems are great for students who hesitate to write as this format allows them to express themselves without making the commitment to writing themselves.
Blackout poems are poems, sentences, phrases created from words of an existing novel (article, newspaper, chapter). Have students underline, first in pencil, words they might like to use in the poem. Now have students use pen circle the words they want to use in the poem. Finally have them black out everything else.

More ideas in presentation below:

7. Found poem
A found poem can be created in a multitude of ways but basically it is a hobbled together set of phrases or sentences. A collection of #sixwordstories could be a found poem. Students could select one phrase or sentence from a text your read aloud to them. Have students each read their catch phrase aloud..ta da instant found poem. Want something more formal? Open up a google doc and have students each add their phrase their. Add images and turn into a presentation (use Animoto and add music). Students love to hear other student’s poems and I am always amazed at how much information gets kicked up!

Found poem template here.

8. Slam poetry
For a larger project or presentation how about a slam poetry event? Students could write poems from the perspective of a character or react to a controversial topic in science (for example Should GMO Crops Be Banned? or Should Designer Babies Be Legal?).

Slam poetry form to use.

Watch these inspiring performances as examples:

 

Infidelity and intentional vagueness

Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.

                                                                                                                Antoine de Saint-Exupery

                                                                                                                                 

I have to confess I have never been faithful. Ever. Over 25 years and I never adopted one planning, teaching schema or framework with 100% fidelity. Moreover I have never taught a course or unit again, in the same order, in the same way. Lastly, I am vague with instructions. Intentionally.

It didn’t start this way. As I began teaching, I saw senior teachers with course binders which they would open and say: “here is today’s lesson.”  I thought: when I have binders like that I will be a great teacher! I also saw examples of elaborately detailed unit plans (many prepared by teachers I never met in person). I thought: when I get going, I am going to make units plans like those and then I will be the teacher I need to be! Lastly, I made sure I knew how to give clear and detailed instructions. I knew exactly when to say “Get your microscopes out!” to avoid confusion. I knew how to organize the bodies of 30 teenage bodies with military precision.

The closer I got to each of these goals, the more uncertain I became they would get me where I wanted to go with my teaching practice. For a long while, I felt guilty about all of this! I thought I was somehow deficient as a teacher in my unwillingness to give in to one planning model or teaching philosophy, in being “unable” to follow the same plan twice and in choosing to give ambiguous instructions.

Making Something My Own is the Making Sense Part

UBD? POGIL? Inquiry? PBL? UDL? So many frameworks and so little time. I wish I could say I had a form to end all others, I wish I could say I had THE recipe. Over time, I realized it wasn’t the form I did or did not use or the framework, I did or did not use.
What mattered was the schema I built, in my brain. And please don’t get me wrong, I thinking planning frameworks and teaching paradigms are both valuable and useful. Planning frameworks (such as UBD) and paradigms have informed me. The act of following someone else’s instructions to the letter on how to design a unit or course did inform and me; it was in the time and effort of churning through to make sense of it in my own brain in conjunction with observations and reflections. The work, the thoughts, the mental lifting which happened within the neurons helped to guide my teaching practice. Over time I have become comfortable with my “always hybrid” approach and the continuous development of my practice.

Planning is Important but Adapting the Plan is More Important

I used to think plans were a script to create in advance to ensure my lessons would be perfect. Now I know plans are not as important as what they become and what they allow for. The act of planning was not to create a script to follow, like actors do on a stage, but to create conditions in which students could write their own lines. The plan is important and valuable but how the plan is liberated and given a life of its own is more meaningful than the plan itself. Lastly, I came to understand that plans would look different each and every time they came to life. I came to understand that responding and adapting to students at a particular time was about teaching students instead of a teaching a course.

Vague Instructions Leave Something to the Imagination: Ambiguity is Good

I used to think good instructions were those when students did exactly what my words said. Now I know good instructions are those enabling students to figure out what they need to do to address their learning.  When I got good at giving detailed instructions, students became really good at following the details but this did not necessarily impact what was going on in their brains. Just because I could get students to do what I instructed them to do did not mean learning was going on.
When I was filling in all the details, students were unused to ambiguity and reading between the lines for themselves. My so called “good instructions” made students rely on me more and propagated the “let’s play school” mindset. Instructions are not about getting kids to do what I say (compliance), instructions are about inviting, invoking and awakening.  I would much rather a student sit an activity out and then later decide for themselves to take part. I realized I wanted structures and strategies to help students move to the deep end of their learning (and did not want strategies that relied on highly prescriptive instructions) rather than strategies and structures that kept them in the shallow end where it was easy for me to “watch them.”

***

How about you? What are you faithful to? How do your plans come to life? How do you see and use instructions?

work or WORK?

work can be organized neatly into binders or filing cabinets. work can be photocopied, attached to emails, and posted to websites with one click.
WORK is fluid and lives off the page. WORK shifts shape and morphs with the moment, in the moment.

work is compliance, completion and just enough. work is black and white, yes or no and containable to a page or a line.
WORK has no beginning or end, makes time disappear and lacks a fixed destination. WORK is messy, challenging and exhilarating all at the same time.

work feels heavy and flat. work is tedious and long, and sits just at the surface.
WORK wakes you up, lights you up and unbalances as it re-balances. WORK comes from deep within and extends out.

work sits in piles on the desk, forgotten once out of sight and recycled. work pushes you out. work says everything.
WORK lingers with you like the fragrance of a favorite perfume. WORK pulls you in, creating space for you to find your way. WORK waits for you to speak.

work is a checklist held externally from you and for you. work is tiny fragments, unidentifiable as to the material they belong. work keeps you infinitely busy.
WORK feels unencumbered, unknown, and unfettered. WORK feeds you forward. WORK paints the bigger picture. WORK says: take your time, I will wait.

work maintains stasis and feeds back to status quo.
WORK unsettles. WORK lifts up and creates a path beyond the farthest horizon.

work is a clone, each piece looking identical to the last. work is made up of puzzle pieces already assembled.
WORK is as unique as DNA and snowflakes. WORK is unpainted and yet unknown.

WORK can simultaneously break and mend your heart.
work will steal your heart and soul.

work can lead to WORK. WORK will never lead to work.
WORK will contain pieces of work. work cannot encompass WORK.

***

which do you do? which do you want to do?
and…
which do you want for our children?

work or WORK?